TL;DR Exhibition Documentation, Photos by Sten Saarits

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Artist: Erki Kasemets (1969) Work: A Place for Taking Notes About All Things (1995-2015)
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Artist: Sten Saarits (1987) Work: Bermuda Triangle (2015)
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Artist: Eva Sepping (1978) Work: I am happy that people are so beautiful and good, 8′ video (2015)
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Artist: Jesús María Rodríguez Santos (1981) Work: tongue honey cucumber horseradish, pheromones (2015)
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Artist: Pille-Riin Jaik (1991)
 Work: Weightless, two channel video installation, 2,58` (2015)
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Artist: Sten Saarits (1987), Work: Bermuda Triangle (2015)
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Artists: Varvara Guljajeva & Mar Canet (1984, 1981) Work: WiFipedia (2015)
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Artist: Andres Lõo (1978), Work: A as in Anonymous, 95x100cm print (2015)
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;paranoia publishing group ltd.(2015)
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Artist: Jesús María Rodríguez Santos (1981) Work: tongue honey cucumber horseradish pheromones (2015)
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Artists: Erki Kasemets (1969) ja Maris Karjatse (1976) Work: Index I-III (2015)
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Artists: Varvara Guljajeva & Mar Canet (1984, 1981) Work: WiFipedia (2015)
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Artist: Pille-Riin Jaik (1991)
, Weightless, two channel video Installation 2,58` (2015)
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TL;DR @ Kunstihoone Gallery

31.07.2015 – 23.08.2015

at Kunstihoone Galerii, Vabaduse väljak 6, Tallinn

TL;DR logo by Jesús Maria Rodríguez Santos
TL;DR logo by Jesús Maria Rodríguez Santos

TL;DR is Internet-jargon for ‘too long didn’t read’.

It’s a dismissive response to a text that was too long or not interesting enough to read. The acronymic response itself wastes no time. Cultural significance can be derived from the new term (coined in 2003) as an example of the demand for a certain style of communication, a need for instant satisfaction and the current state of attention spans. Media theorists attribute this change in literacy, as a response to information overload. When an environment overwhelms the senses, we revert to aural, spatial and visual styles of information processing as well as pattern recognition. The artwork selected for this international group exhibition of contemporary art explores the themes of information overload and the manipulation of media ecologies.

Artists: 

Andres LõoErki KasemetsEva Sepping

Sten SaaritsJesús Maria Rodríguez SantosKIWAPille-Riin Jaik

Varvara Guljajeva Mar Canet

Exhibition Designer: Neeme Külm of Valge Kuup

Curator: Stacey Koosel

Exhibition Opening Events:

18.00 on the 31.07.2015 

18.00 Speech by HE Spanish Ambassador Fernando García Casas

19.00 Presentation by KIWA of ;paranoia publishing group ltd 

19.30 Sound Performance by Andres Lõo

20.00 Mural completion by Jesús Maria Rodríguez Santos

This exhibition was made possible through support by:

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The Homunculus Collection Documentation, Photos by Sten Saarits

The Homunculus Collection
Sten Saarits, Light Drop (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Sten Saarits, Light Drop (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Laura Kuusk, Gift Ideas (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Laura Kuusk, Gift Ideas (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Hekla Dögg Jónsdóttir, Sinu Süda / Your Heart (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Hekla Dögg Jónsdóttir, Sinu Süda / Your Heart (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Carlos Lazarich, Cuerpos (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Carlos Lazarich, Cuerpos (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Sten Saartis, Heureka (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Sten Saartis, Heureka (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Micheal Sell, Residency: Pressley, 2013 (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Micheal Sell, Residency: Pressley, 2013 (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Carla Castiajo, Fertile Field For Fertility (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Carla Castiajo, Fertile Field For Fertility (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Carla Castiajo, Fertile Field For Fertility (2014)
The Homunculus Collection
Camille Laurelli, Riot / Mäss (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Camille Laurelli, Riot / Mäss (2013)
The Homunculus Collection
Camille Laurelli, Riot / Mäss (2013)

The Hypnotist Collector: An Estonian/Spanish Art Exchange

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“Estonia and Spain are separated by thousands of kilometers. As geographically opposite poles of heterogeneous Europe – North and South – they possess very different historical, cultural and artistic trajectories. Until a little less than two decades ago, they belonged to different worlds with the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic hidden behind the Iron Curtain in the Eastern Bloc, and Spain aligned with the seemingly capitalist and democratic ideals of the Western Bloc of Europe. On an artistic level, a superficial glance at this world of the early 1980s, divided into blocs, would set Estonia in the framework of official socialist state commissioned art linked to the occupying Soviet regime, and Spain into a production framework linked to the logics of postmodernism as a dominant cultural paradigm. While there is some truth in this simplistic vision, it requires certain historical nuances with artistic freedom as the litmus test that reveals the everyday reality of different social conditions.”

See full article in English and Spanish at:

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