Estonian Art 2/2018

The Baltic Issue

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In this issue of Estonian Art we focus on Baltic art, design, and architecture.

For Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, 2018 marks a century since their first declaration of independence. To celebrate their centennials and explore the cultural ties between these three Baltic nations, we have dedicated this as a special issue where we look at not just present collaborations in the fields of art, design, and architecture, but also on landmark historical cultural collaborations.

In art, Inga Lāce writes about Latvian/Estonian artist Diana Tamane in Diana Tamane: Jet Lag. In The Value of Wilderness, Auguste Petre reviews the exhibition “Wild Souls. Symbolism in the Baltic States” at the Orsay Museum in Paris. Mai Levin traces the Baltic roots of the Tallinn Print Triennial for its 50th anniversary in Tallinn Graphic Art Triennials Up to the 1990s. Keiu Krikmann reviews the Tallinn exhibition of the Baltic Triennial in Haunted at the Body Party, which for the first time was organized in the three Baltic capitals: Vilnius, Tallinn, and Riga. The current flurry of Baltic artistic collaborations at the first ever Riga Biennial (RIBOCA), the Baltic Triennial 13 and the second Riga Photography Biennale are captured in four visual essays by Merike Estna, Young Boy Dancing Group, Reinis Hofmanis & Margus Tamm and Sandra Jõgeva.

In design, Karolina Jakaite explores proto design in Soviet Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania in Design by Another Name. In architecture, Triin Ojari writes about The Baltic Pavilion at the Paris World EXPO in 1937, and Johan Tali looks back on the The Baltic Pavilion in Venice in 2016. In books, Paul Paper shares his Top Ten Books.

 

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Estonian Art 20

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Estonian Art’s 20th Anniversary Book

Estonian Art is a magazine dedicated to promoting art, design and architecture that has been published by the Estonian Institute since 1997. Estonian Art celebrates its 20th anniversary with a special publication that looks back on the last 20 years of Estonian contemporary art, as told from the perspective of the artists. Fifteen Estonian artists were invited to interview the artist who had influenced their work. The conversations between thirty artists are accompanied with portraits by Mark Raidpere.

With interviews by:

Kai Kaljo – Jaan Toomik
Erki Kasemets – Ene-Liis Semper
Kaido Ole – Tōnis Saadoja
Tanel Veenre – Jaanus Samma
Kiwa – Marco Laimre
Sirja-Liisa Eelma – Krista Mölder
Sandra Jõgeva – Tanel Saar
Pille-Riin Jaik – Mark Raidpere
Peeter Laurits – Kadri Mälk
Ly Lestberg – Tanja Muravskaja
Marko Mäetamm – Mall Nukke
Laura Kuusk – Liina Siib
Raoul Kurvitz – Jass Kaselaan
Andres Lõo – Raul Keller
Flo Kasearu – Jüri Ojaver

Editor: Stacey Koosel

Designer: Jaanus Samma

Photographer: Mark Raidpere

Language: English

Cover: Soft

Pages: 220

Format: 240 x 185  x 18 mm

Publisher: Estonian Institute, 2018

 

Estonian Art 20 can be purchased online: 

Apollo 

Estonia 100 Webshop

Find Estonian Art 20 in these fine shops:

KIASMA Finnish National Gallery 

KUMU Art Museum of Estonia

Puänt Bookstore

Lugemik Bookstore

 

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Estonian Art 1/2018

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The Architecture Issue

Estonian Art magazine published its first ever architecture devoted issue – that will be distributed by the Estonian Center for Architecture at the Venice Architecture Biennale.

Estonian Art 1/2018 focuses on  architecture, urbanism and the public sphere. It was made in collaborated with the Estonian Center for Architecture and the architecture curators going to Venice this spring. Tadeáš Říha, Laura Linsi and Roland Reemaa are three young architects who will represent Estonia at the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale with the project Weak Monument. Tüüne-Kristin Vaikla interviews the curatorial trio in “Sensitive Interventions in Venice”. The inspiration behind the Venice Biennale project is traced in Tadeáš Říha’s article “Weakness in Architecture” based on his research into the philosophical topic. Gregor Taul’s “Free Some Space for Weak Monuments” demonstrates how monuments can become memories and Francisco Martinez’s “Architectural Taxidermy” ponders the repurposing of obsolete spaces.

The Weak Monument theme is further explored in specially commissioned visual essays by Tõnu Tunnel with “Is a Monument Land Stuck in Time?”, Dénes Farkas’s “Monument” and Paco Ulman’s “C:\Works\2017\Kuressaare”. Estonian architecture is presented in bite-sized morsels in Carl-Dag Lige’s “Mini Architecture Histories” sampled from his popular Instagram account. Julia Hinderink interviews Sille Pihlak and Siim Tuksam of PART (Practice for Architecture Research and Theory) in “New Kids On the Block”. Karin Bachmann talks about the newest wave of green urban planning in “The New Modernity of the Urban Thicket” and Villem Tomiste gives us a peek into what’s coming next in “Looking Forward to the 5th Tallinn Architecture Biennial”.   

Estonian Art is a magazine dedicated to promoting Estonian art, design and architecture that has been published by the Estonian Institute since 1997. Estonian Art 1/2018 was supported by the Estonian Center for Architecture and Estonia’s centenary programme Estonia 100.

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Estonian Art 2/2017

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Estonian Art Goes to Bozar in Brussels

Estonian Art 2/2017 focuses on screen-based art and will be distributed at BOZAR, the Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels to accompany an exhibition of Estonian video art. In September (14.09 – 12.11.2017) “The Archaeology of the Screen: The Estonian Example”, curated by Eha Komissarov, will open at BOZAR. The exhibition explores the relationship between art and new media and includes works by Paul Kuimet, Taavi Suisalu, Marge Monko, Sigrid Viir, Ivar Veermäe, Tõnis Vint, Yuri Sobolev and Katja Novitskova.

The exhibition at BOZAR coincides with the move of the Presidency of the Council of the European Union to Estonia, Estonia’s celebration of its centennial in 2018 (EV100), and the opening of a new wing of BOZAR focused on media art – BOZAR Lab. Estonian Art delves into the medium of the screen in contemporary art with texts by Raivo Kelomees, Andres Lõo, Ragne Nukk, Nithikul Nimkulrat and Eha Komissarov. There are visual essays by Marge Monko and Taavi Suisalu.

This issue of Estonian Art also includes articles on design, books and architecture, with a special nod to Belgian/Estonian architectural collaborations and the Tallinn Architecture Biennale opening this September articles by Eve Arpo, Triin Männik and Gregor Taul.

Estonian Art celebrates its 20th anniversary this year (1997-2017) with a special publication that launches at Kumu this November (15.11.2017) and international locations later this year. The 20th anniversary publication of Estonian Art will include portraits of Estonian artists by Mark Raidpere, with a visual preview included in this issue.

Visit our Website www.estonianart.ee

Order a copy of the magazine: here

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Estonian Art 1/2016

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ESTONIAN ART’S 2016 MAGAZINE, WEBSITE and LAUNCH PARTY

The 2016 Issue of Estonian Art Magazine Focuses on Art Publishing in Estonia

 Estonian Art is an English language art magazine published by the Estonian Institute, since 1997. This issue of Estonian Art focuses on the phenomena of art publishing in Estonia.

The rise of independent book publishers run by and for the artistic community, have become a notable trend in how contemporary Estonian art and design is conceptualized and distributed both locally and internationally. From the Lugemik Bookshop in the yard of the Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia in Tallinn to ;paranoia publishing group ltd’s bookshop in Tartu Art Museum – art publishers in Estonia have reconfigured the current cultural climate. Estonian Art magazine traces the lifeline of the art publication from concept and design to the publishing house floor. The story of art publishing in Estonia is told by eight authors.

Marika Agu talks to Kiwa about ;paranoia publishing and considers the effects of ;paranoia publishing group ltd. Ott Kagovere writes about Lugemik and graphic design in Estonia. Martin Rünk talks to the editors of the multi-media publication project New Material and New Number. Andreas Trossek, editor of Estonia’s oldest art magazine talks about KUNST.EE and the digital Turn. Laura Kuusk and Pascale Riou speak about the “Side Effects” book and projects, and there is a photo essay by Liina Siib on Tallinn Book Printers.

The issue also contains articles about Estonian architecture, design and art history.

Estonian Art magazine is internationally distributed to arts institutions in over twenty countries as well as locally to all major arts institutions in Estonia. Estonian Art is also now online, with its own website and social media presence at www.estonianart.ee

Estonian Art magazine will celebrate the new issue with a launch party open to the public on Friday, October 28th at EKKM Kohvik (Põhja pst 35) at 18:00.

New issue coming out in April 2017!

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The Hypnotist Collector: An Estonian/Spanish Art Exchange

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“Estonia and Spain are separated by thousands of kilometers. As geographically opposite poles of heterogeneous Europe – North and South – they possess very different historical, cultural and artistic trajectories. Until a little less than two decades ago, they belonged to different worlds with the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic hidden behind the Iron Curtain in the Eastern Bloc, and Spain aligned with the seemingly capitalist and democratic ideals of the Western Bloc of Europe. On an artistic level, a superficial glance at this world of the early 1980s, divided into blocs, would set Estonia in the framework of official socialist state commissioned art linked to the occupying Soviet regime, and Spain into a production framework linked to the logics of postmodernism as a dominant cultural paradigm. While there is some truth in this simplistic vision, it requires certain historical nuances with artistic freedom as the litmus test that reveals the everyday reality of different social conditions.”

See full article in English and Spanish at:

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The Digital Turn

The Digital Turn

Book Synopsis

“By combining the analysis of the new forms and environments of the digital world with critical scholarship of the role of the users, this book argues that cultural field is facing a challenge of the digital turn. The digital turn hereby implies that changes in the use and application of digital technology bring on changes in practice and in the relationships between cultural institutions and audiences. We approach the changes in society from the structural (institutional) as well as from the agential (audiences, users, individuals) perspective. The authors represented in this book share the view that there is no need to fear the new media pushing aside traditional cultural forms, acknowledging at the same time that the scope of this cultural change is far from understood.”