Estonian Art 1/2017

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Estonian Art Focuses on Katja Novitskova and Post-Internet Art 

In homage to the internationally acclaimed Estonian artist Katja Novitskova representing Estonia with ‘If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with 
Your Eyes’
 at the 57th Venice Biennale, we dig into the influential international art movement known as post-internet art. We trace the movement’s past, present and future while covering exciting new ground in contemporary art, design and architecture. Post-internet art can be defined as all art that has been influenced by network culture and acknowledges the influence of the cyber, the digital and the glowing, pervasive screen.
Themes of post-apocalyptic survival, the Anthropocene and the ubiquitous post-internet fern come together in a movement that merges art with design and the virtual with the tangible.
The post-internet movement and its wake are approached from different angles with articles and specially commissioned visual essays by seventeen authors: Katja Novitskova chats with Jaakko Pallasvuo about the imposter syndrome and mushrooms, Eva-Erle Lilleaed traces Novitskova’s animals and oeuvre, and Kati Ilves talks about If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes. In an Estonian-Lithuanian cultural exchange, Konstanet founder Keiu Krikmann writes about Pakui Hardware, and Pakui Hardware’s Neringa Černiauskaitė writes about Konstanet.

 

In design, Ott Kagovere considers the trolling elements of post-internet graphic design, Sofia Hallik writes about cybernetic influences and Kaarin Kivirähk captures the present moment in post-internet fashion. Martin Rünk talks to Kristina Õllek and Kert Viiart about EXHIBIT_ONSCROLL. Pau Wealder gives an international perspective on Spanish post-internet art practices, while Raivo Kelomees gives an art history lesson, tracing 90s net-art to the post-internet movement with a post-modern glossary of contradictory terms. Mikk Madisson and Rainar Aasrand chronicle how SKATKA reveals the seedy underbelly of e-utopias.

There are two visual essays in this issue by Norman Orro and Kristina Õllek & Kert Viiart based on their Instagram exhibition @exhibit_onscroll.

The issue also contains articles about Estonian architecture and design.

 

The new issue of Estonian Art will come out in September of 2017!

Visit our Website www.estonianart.ee

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Dissertation

COVER

Stacey Koosel’s PhD thesis is a collection of articles that explore the effects of social media on personal identity.

The communication of identity narratives online has become abundant with the increasing popularity of social media. Social media enables users to build profiles based on their personal identities, making identity play a primary source of entertainment in the information age.

Topics such as privacy, ethical use of information, authenticity, social control, self-expression, self-censorship and other media affordances have all, subsequently, become important issues. The topic of ‘identity’ is used as a framework through which social media use can be analysed. The cultural phenomenon of digital identity is explored in a collection of seven articles using different approaches, including media ecology, the philosophy of technology, virtual ethnography and artistic research.

The articles raise questions about the ideology of identity creation in social media, by interviewing artists on how they use Facebook, pointing out paradigm shifts and paradoxes in contemporary culture and the discussion of other research in the field of digital culture.

See uploaded dissertation file here:

The Regeotiated Self: Social Media’s Effects on Identity 

The Digital Turn

The Digital Turn

Book Synopsis

“By combining the analysis of the new forms and environments of the digital world with critical scholarship of the role of the users, this book argues that cultural field is facing a challenge of the digital turn. The digital turn hereby implies that changes in the use and application of digital technology bring on changes in practice and in the relationships between cultural institutions and audiences. We approach the changes in society from the structural (institutional) as well as from the agential (audiences, users, individuals) perspective. The authors represented in this book share the view that there is no need to fear the new media pushing aside traditional cultural forms, acknowledging at the same time that the scope of this cultural change is far from understood.”