Estonian Art 2/2017

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Estonian Art Goes to Bozar in Brussels

Estonian Art 2/2017 focuses on screen-based art and will be distributed at BOZAR, the Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels to accompany an exhibition of Estonian video art. In September (14.09 – 12.11.2017) “The Archaeology of the Screen: The Estonian Example”, curated by Eha Komissarov, will open at BOZAR. The exhibition explores the relationship between art and new media and includes works by Paul Kuimet, Taavi Suisalu, Marge Monko, Sigrid Viir, Ivar Veermäe, Tõnis Vint, Yuri Sobolev and Katja Novitskova.

The exhibition at BOZAR coincides with the move of the Presidency of the Council of the European Union to Estonia, Estonia’s celebration of its centennial in 2018 (EV100), and the opening of a new wing of BOZAR focused on media art – BOZAR Lab. Estonian Art delves into the medium of the screen in contemporary art with texts by Raivo Kelomees, Andres Lõo, Ragne Nukk, Nithikul Nimkulrat and Eha Komissarov. There are visual essays by Marge Monko and Taavi Suisalu.

This issue of Estonian Art also includes articles on design, books and architecture, with a special nod to Belgian/Estonian architectural collaborations and the Tallinn Architecture Biennale opening this September articles by Eve Arpo, Triin Männik and Gregor Taul.

Estonian Art celebrates its 20th anniversary this year (1997-2017) with a special publication that launches at Kumu this November (15.11.2017) and international locations later this year. The 20th anniversary publication of Estonian Art will include portraits of Estonian artists by Mark Raidpere, with a visual preview included in this issue.

Visit our Website www.estonianart.ee

Order a copy of the magazine: here

Follow Estonian Art on:  Twitter / Facebook / Instagram /Pinterest 

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Estonian Art 1/2017

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Estonian Art Focuses on Katja Novitskova and Post-Internet Art 

In homage to the internationally acclaimed Estonian artist Katja Novitskova representing Estonia with ‘If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with 
Your Eyes’
 at the 57th Venice Biennale, we dig into the influential international art movement known as post-internet art. We trace the movement’s past, present and future while covering exciting new ground in contemporary art, design and architecture. Post-internet art can be defined as all art that has been influenced by network culture and acknowledges the influence of the cyber, the digital and the glowing, pervasive screen.
Themes of post-apocalyptic survival, the Anthropocene and the ubiquitous post-internet fern come together in a movement that merges art with design and the virtual with the tangible.
The post-internet movement and its wake are approached from different angles with articles and specially commissioned visual essays by seventeen authors: Katja Novitskova chats with Jaakko Pallasvuo about the imposter syndrome and mushrooms, Eva-Erle Lilleaed traces Novitskova’s animals and oeuvre, and Kati Ilves talks about If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes. In an Estonian-Lithuanian cultural exchange, Konstanet founder Keiu Krikmann writes about Pakui Hardware, and Pakui Hardware’s Neringa Černiauskaitė writes about Konstanet.

 

In design, Ott Kagovere considers the trolling elements of post-internet graphic design, Sofia Hallik writes about cybernetic influences and Kaarin Kivirähk captures the present moment in post-internet fashion. Martin Rünk talks to Kristina Õllek and Kert Viiart about EXHIBIT_ONSCROLL. Pau Wealder gives an international perspective on Spanish post-internet art practices, while Raivo Kelomees gives an art history lesson, tracing 90s net-art to the post-internet movement with a post-modern glossary of contradictory terms. Mikk Madisson and Rainar Aasrand chronicle how SKATKA reveals the seedy underbelly of e-utopias.

There are two visual essays in this issue by Norman Orro and Kristina Õllek & Kert Viiart based on their Instagram exhibition @exhibit_onscroll.

The issue also contains articles about Estonian architecture and design.

 

The new issue of Estonian Art will come out in September of 2017!

Visit our Website www.estonianart.ee

Order a copy of the magazine: here

Follow Estonian Art on:  Twitter / Facebook / Instagram /Pinterest 

Dissertation

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Stacey Koosel’s PhD thesis is a collection of articles that explore the effects of social media on personal identity.

The communication of identity narratives online has become abundant with the increasing popularity of social media. Social media enables users to build profiles based on their personal identities, making identity play a primary source of entertainment in the information age.

Topics such as privacy, ethical use of information, authenticity, social control, self-expression, self-censorship and other media affordances have all, subsequently, become important issues. The topic of ‘identity’ is used as a framework through which social media use can be analysed. The cultural phenomenon of digital identity is explored in a collection of seven articles using different approaches, including media ecology, the philosophy of technology, virtual ethnography and artistic research.

The articles raise questions about the ideology of identity creation in social media, by interviewing artists on how they use Facebook, pointing out paradigm shifts and paradoxes in contemporary culture and the discussion of other research in the field of digital culture.

See uploaded dissertation file here:

The Regeotiated Self: Social Media’s Effects on Identity 

The Homunculus Collection

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German silent film director Otto Ripert raised questions about the ethical consequences of creating artificial human life in a series of films called Homunculus (1916 – 1917). The plot of the Homunculus followed the life of a man who could not feel love. When the Homunculus discovers he was artificially created and did not have a soul, he decides to set the world on fire – but changes his plans when he realizes becoming a political despot would be better revenge on humanity.

August 13th – September 1st

Hobusepea Gallery

Tallinn, Estonia

Wednesday August 13th

Exhibition Opening & Artist Talk 18.00

Featuring Works By:

HEKLA DÖGG JÓNSDÓTTIR (IS)

STEN SAARITS (EE)

CARLA CASTIAJO (EE/PT)

 CAMILLE LAURELLI (FR)

 LAURA KUUSK (EE/FR)

MIKE SELL (USA)

Curated by:

 Stacey Koosel (CA/ EE)

The Hypnotist Collector: An Estonian/Spanish Art Exchange

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“Estonia and Spain are separated by thousands of kilometers. As geographically opposite poles of heterogeneous Europe – North and South – they possess very different historical, cultural and artistic trajectories. Until a little less than two decades ago, they belonged to different worlds with the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic hidden behind the Iron Curtain in the Eastern Bloc, and Spain aligned with the seemingly capitalist and democratic ideals of the Western Bloc of Europe. On an artistic level, a superficial glance at this world of the early 1980s, divided into blocs, would set Estonia in the framework of official socialist state commissioned art linked to the occupying Soviet regime, and Spain into a production framework linked to the logics of postmodernism as a dominant cultural paradigm. While there is some truth in this simplistic vision, it requires certain historical nuances with artistic freedom as the litmus test that reveals the everyday reality of different social conditions.”

See full article in English and Spanish at:

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